Just Watching – February 2019

 For the last few years I’ve kept my eyes peeled for any item touching men and women who are over 85 years of age, the ones I call Super-Seniors.  They are the successor segment to the 65-85 year olds that throughout most of my life were called Seniors and often treated as if they were the last stop before heaven.  But given there are a lot more Super Seniors today than in the past and that their numbers are mounting.  Sadly the ignorance about them, even the denial of their existence by some seems to be mounting, too.  That probably should come as no surprise.  Not many today and fewer in the recent past live as if they will be old enough to example George Burn’s 95th birthday quip, “If I’d known I’d live this long I’d have taken better care of myself.”  That comment usually gets a wry guffaw of recognition in response.

But surprise, surprise.  Here I am within a few weeks of my 90th natal day.  Together with 490,000 Super-Senior men and women (with more coming stage center every day) I greet a new dawn.  In the near future public parking lots will be divided between “Handicap Parking” and “Really Handicapped Parking”.  It’ll be parking at the curb out on the street for everyone else.  I suppose that when that happens those 10% Senior discounts at restaurants and drug stores will be limited to Super-Seniors Only – first come, first served. 

Far-fetched?  Probably not.  Today, I’m told, in tiny Ecuador, long lines of people waiting to buy basic family goods form each day. Another but much shorter parallel line is also formed and monitored by the police.  It is limited to those who are infirmed or disabled, to pregnant women, to mothers with small children and to a group called the Third Age.  That Third Age is composed of people over 65 years of age who can prove it.  Anyone who tries to work their way into that line without proof of age are unceremoniously removed. 

Will the USA ever adopt a Third Age classification?  Who knows, but it has to be obvious that a kind of Third Age category is already upon us.  Look at the “older” age related housing, medical care or pension tsunami that is building in our society.  How many are projected to ultimately end up bankrupt or in default?  Think Tanks of all kind are tussling today with how the projected 20 billion people of our 2050 world will be supported.  Where will they live?  Will they have food and clean water?  What will the energy needs be in 31years? 

As you consider all that remember it wasn’t until the mid-1800s that the world population reached one billion. It wasn’t until the 1930s that it doubled to two billion.  Now a population of twenty billion within 30 years?  Hey, wait a minute!   Large chunks of our R and C Resources readership may still be alive then!   As L’il Abner (remember him?) would have said, “Who’d a’ thunk it?”

Yes, indeed, “Who’d a’ thunk it?”  And that’s the question Super Seniors (plus parents, pastors, Think Tankers and concerned leaders of all kinds) need to wrestle with today.

As I was preparing this issue of Just Watching and thinking about sharing this kind of supersonic change for Super-Seniors there came to my mind a mythological Greek figure from the past: Cassandra, the daughter of Priam, king of Troy.  As one story about her goes she was object of the god Apollo’s affection.  He offered her the gift of prophecy if she would become his.  She said yes to the receiving the gift of prophesy (and received it) but then no to Apollo’s desires (and didn’t keep her word).  How did Apollo react?  He put a curse on her that while she would receive the gift of prophecy no one would believe her.  Possible?  Hardly.

There are many “prophets”, past and present, who deal with Cassandra’s double whammy.  They possess a needed truth but those with whom they most want to share it spurn their offering.   Possible?  How about probable! 

Many a Cassandra-like caring parent (prophet) yearns to guide an obstinate child who will not listen or obey.   Or, many a Cassandra-like faithful pastor (prophet) speaks the truth in love to an intractable parishioner or an unyielding parish.  Or, how about the Cassandra-like political visionary (prophet) who agonize over constituents who spurn 21st societal improvements.

All this is nothing new.  There is a well-known collective paraphrase of many Old and New Testament texts that essentially say, “There’s none so blind as he who will not see – or deaf as he who will not hear.”  Even so, the ministry of many past or present “prophets” (like Jeremiah, John the Baptist – your own Mom or Dad) is to painfully speak the truth no matter what.

So how’s it going with those in the 21st century who faithfully keep testifying to undeniable life realities?   My answer is, “Not so good”.  Cassandra’s curse is still very much alive.

Notwithstanding, R and C Resources will continue its focus on the needs of individuals, home life and local parishes. For personal reasons, since I am one, I’ve been especially concerned with the Super-Seniors among whom I find myself.  My goal is that of tending to a number of practical issues.

  1. I will keep pushing whomever I can toward a better ministry to Super-Seniors.
  2. I will continue exploring those post-85 years, a Bonus Land that God has given to a rising number of us! 
  3. I will recognize that change is a constant and that more of it is on the way.  It’s not over until it’s over.  Change isn’t slowing down even a little bit.   
  4. I need to remember that centuries before Christ was born the Romans taught each other: “Tempore mutantur, et nos mutamur in illes” (which means, “The times are changing and we are changing in them”).  Much earlier Greeks agreed.  Their cryptic saying was, “Panta rhei” (which means, “Everything flows”).  That quote from Ovid of old was later adopted and adapted by the Lutheran Reformers.   
  5. As a 21st century Super-Senior I am committed to blessing my heirs with Johnny Mercer’s 1944 instruction for living life in God’s Bonus Land.  He urged a three step approach of, “accentuating the positive, eliminating the negative while latching on to the affirmative”.  Super-Seniors might adopt that song as guidance for life.   What do you think?

In any case, today is the day God has given us.  As I hold it in my hand a well-known quote attributed to many surfaces: “Yesterday is history.  Tomorrow is a mystery.  Today is a gift – which is why we call it the Present.”   Why God has chosen to gift me as long as He has – and as long as He yet will – I know not.  But that fact that He urges me to unwrap it hour by hour and as best I am able, use it to His glory and for the benefit of all with whom He surrounds me.   In God’s economy of things each day is a mulligan.  Maybe next time I’ll be able to keep my head down and follow through.

Join me at the tee?

Charlie